The Language Barrier Will Soon Be a Thing of the Past

Forget the days of trying to talk to someone of another language and flipping through a pocket dictionary to find the right word, struggling through an awkward guessing game of various nouns, verbs and non-word sounds to try to communicate with the person. Today’s translation tools can provide real-time translation that you can carry with you in your pocket.

According to the Wall Street Journal,  translation tools of the modern age were developed by computing more than a billion translations a day for over 200 million people. With the exponential growth in data, that number is growing and the ever-evolving software is filling in the communication gaps in pronunciation and interpretation.

A pocket translator seems like fun in and of itself, but think of the possibilities in medical care, education, scientific collaboration, etc… when the communication barrier is removed, and we can communicate easily with people we would otherwise be cut off from. We will be more connected as a species. It’s almost biblical in proportions, isn’t it? Sayonara, language barrier!

Photo courtesy of wearbleo.com.

Eagle Scout Project Creates a Sensory Education Room to Help Kids With Autism to Learn

Responding to the needs he saw in his own brother and other autistic students, this Eagle Scout created a Sensory Education Room at his local middle school to help autistic students learn in a specially tailored environment.

He raised $30,000 and was able to develop and build two such rooms. The teachers are overjoyed at the new learning opportunities they are able to offer their students and the ways this room is developing them. This is awesome!

To learn more, watch the video here.

The Ocean Clean-Up Project Will Clean Up 50% of the World’s Largest Ocean Garbage Patch in Five Years

 

Photo credit: Dezeen.com

The Ocean Cleanup foundation, founded by Dutch engineering student Boyan Slat when he was just 20 years old, will begin work in the first half of 2018– two years ahead of schedule!

Its first major operation will begin in an area known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch – a swirling vortex of mainly plastic waste located in the northern part of the Pacific Ocean.

As reported by dezeen.com —

“The team will use a floating barrier to slowly push the plastic to shore. This update of the initial design, which was recognised at the Designs of The Year awards in 2015, will be weighted to move with the current instead of fixed to the sea bed. Once ashore, the waste plastic would be recycled and turned into sellable products to help fund the project.

… ‘The elegance of the design is that we managed to make it even simpler,’ he added. ‘It’s just one barrier, one anchor, two lines connecting them and a central passive collection point for the plastic.’

… Slat first came up with the Ocean Cleanup idea in 2011 when he was 16, after a diving holiday in Greece where he saw a huge amount of plastic waste in the water. He developed this into a school project, which was given an award by Delft’s University of Technology.

His organisation now has over 100 volunteers, including scientists and engineers, and is supported by 15 other institutions.”

According to its website, a full-scale deployment of the system is estimated to clean up 50 % of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch in 5 years.

Great news for our planet and how inspiring that one idea can make all the difference!